Coliseum Restoration

Date

2021

Category

Featured,

The Coliseum building is set to open June 19, 2024

Mark your calendars for the Grand Opening – part of Soul of the Southside’s Juneteenth celebration

The goal of this project is to create generational wealth for BIPOC small business owners through the equitable redevelopment of a building that was damaged in the civil unrest following the murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police.

The Coliseum project is part of the larger rebuilding of Lake Street following the civil unrest that impacted much of the corridor. Most of the commercial node at 27th Ave S. and East Lake Street was burned to the ground, permanently impacting a corner that was referred to as “Downtown Longfellow.” The Coliseum was badly damaged but was not a total loss like most of the surrounding structures. The restoration of the Coliseum building is a key part of the Longfellow neighborhood’s healing process.

The 85,000 square foot Coliseum building has long been a beacon for local businesses and BIPOC entrepreneurs. Through the redevelopment process led by Redesign, Inc. the building is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In coalition with many community partners, we have committed to a set of principles that aims to center BIPOC voices throughout the redevelopment process along the corridor. 

Redesign is partnering with three local Black-owned small businesses – Urban Design Perspectives, Common Sense Consulting, and Du Nord Social Spirits – to be both tenants and long-term owners in the Coliseum Building. Through this partnership, the voices of people of color will be at the table making the key decisions on how this community moves forward. The restoration of this historic building aims to ensure long-term affordability for up to 30 BIPOC and local entrepreneurs/small businesses.

The redeveloped Coliseum building will provide approximately 85,000 square feet of commercial/retail/office space, incubator space for local BIPOC professionals and BIPOC-led firms, an event center, and an on-site restaurant & bar.

The health and well-being of a community can usually be seen in the faces of its residents, in its architecture, and in its businesses & streetscape. Given the unrest throughout the Longfellow neighborhood and in particular the devastation along Lake Street, the community is in need of healing. Through the leadership of fiveXfive Public Art, artwork by local BIPOC artists will be featured throughout the building and will be available for purchase.

 

Leasing

Leasing opportunities for the Coliseum Building are expected to become available in May 2024.

View the Leasing Brochure.

If you are interested in leasing space at the Coliseum, please click here.

 

Media Coverage:

Coliseum Building redevelopment project aims to uplift BIPOC businesses | KARE 11

Activism for Community Voice | Urban Design Perspectives

Black Architect-Developers of the Twin Cities: Their Journeys, What’s Next, and Why It Matters | enter mn

Lake Street is coming back | Southside Pride

Coliseum Building in Minneapolis earns low carbon verification | REjournals

Coalition hopes to give Lake Street’s Coliseum Building new life | Star Tribune

Exploring the rich history of 27th and Lake | MinnPost

From the Rubble, an Ambitious Effort to Rebuild Differently | McKnight Foundation

Group Aims to Rebuild Lake Street’s Coliseum Building After Uprising Fire | Minnesota Monthly

After George Floyd, One Terp Helps a Neighborhood Rebuild | Maryland Today

Coliseum project highlights power of equitable development | Hennepin County Department of Housing and Economic Development

Redesign saves Coliseum from wrecking ball | Longfellow Nokomis Messenger

Restaurant Owner Whose Business Burned Calls For Justice For George Floyd | National Public Radio

Reviving Lake Street: Nonprofit community groups spearheading recovery | MinnPost

Saving the Coliseum: New life rises from the ashes of violence | Minnesota Spokesman Recorder

Seward Redesign closes on Coliseum sale in Minneapolis | Finance & Commerce

St. Anthony: Rebuilding the ‘downtown’ of Longfellow is going to be a long haul | Star Tribune